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 Ontarion Curriculum for Social Studies - Grade 6

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PostSubject: Ontarion Curriculum for Social Studies - Grade 6   Thu Jul 19, 2012 7:08 pm

Référence : The Ontario Curriculum, Social Studies Grades 1 to 6 - History and Geography Grades 7 and 8 (2004)

(Pages 7 / 31, 32, 33 / 47, 48, 59)

Social Studies Full Curriculum - Click HERE

The overall expectations describe in general terms the knowledge and skills that students are expected to achieve and apply by the end of each grade.

• The specific expectations describe the expected knowledge and skills in greater detail. The specific expectations are grouped under subheadings that reflect particular aspects of the required knowledge and skills and that may serve as a guide for teachers as they plan learning activities for their students. The subheadings for social studies, history, and geography are: Knowledge and Understanding; Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills; and Application. An additional subheading, Map, Globe, and Graphic Skills, is included in the Canada and World Connections strand for Grades 1 to 6 and in geography for Grades 7 and 8. This organization is not meant to imply that the expectations in any one group are achieved independently of the expectations in the other groups. The subheadings are used merely to help teachers focus on particular aspects of knowledge and skills as they develop and present various lessons and learning activities for their students.

Teachers will examine both overall and specific expectations in their ongoing assessment of student learning so that they can plan appropriate teaching and learning experiences.

Many of the expectations are accompanied by examples, given in parentheses. These examples are meant to illustrate the kind of skill, the specific area of learning, the depth of learning, and/or the level of complexity that the expectation entails. They are intended as a guide for teachers rather than as an exhaustive or mandatory list. For example, in Canada and World Connections: Grade 2 – Features of Communities Around the World, there is a specific expectation that students will:

- identify similarities and differences (e.g., in food, clothing, homes, recreation, land use, transportation, language) between their community and a community in another part of the world.

Teachers do not have to cover the full list of examples but might select two or three areas of focus from that list, or might choose areas of focus that are not included in the list.

Page 9

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Heritage and Citizenship: Grade 6 – First Nation Peoples and European Explorers

Overview

Students learn about the main characteristics of North American First Nation cultures, including the close relationship of the First Nation peoples with the natural environment. They investigate the motivating factors for early European exploration and the prevailing attitudes of the explorers. They also examine the positive and negative effects of interactions between European and First Nation peoples, from first Viking contact to the time of permanent European settlement in the early seventeenth century.

Overall Expectations
By the end of Grade 6, students will:

• describe characteristics of pre-contact First Nation cultures across Canada, including their close relationships with the natural environment; the motivations and attitudes of the European explorers; and the effects of contact on both the receiving and the incoming groups;

• use a variety of resources and tools to investigate different historical points of view about the positive and negative effects of early contact between First Nation peoples and European explorers;

• analyse examples of interaction between First Nation peoples and European explorers to identify and report on the effects of cooperation and the reasons for disagreements between the two groups.

Specific Expectations

Knowledge and Understanding
By the end of Grade 6, students will:

– examine various theories about the origins of First Nation and Inuit peoples in North America (e.g., that they crossed the Bering land bridge, had always been indigenous to North America, travelled by water from South America);

– describe the attitude to the environment of various First Nation groups (e.g., Nisga’a, Mi’kmaq, James Bay Cree) and show how it affected their practices in daily life (e.g., with respect to food, shelter, clothes, transportation);

– compare key social and cultural characteristics of Algonquian and Iroquoian groups (e.g., language; agriculture and hunting; governance; matriarchal and patriarchal societies; arts; storytelling; trade; recreation; roles of men,women, and children);

– identify the Viking, French, and English explorers who first came to and explored Canada, and explain the reasons for their journeys (e.g., the early-fifteenth-century blockade of overland trade routes and the resulting search for new routes to the Far East; the fishing industry; the fur trade;
the search for gold; population growth in Europe leading to the search for new
areas for settlement);

– identify technological developments and cultural factors that assisted and promoted the exploration of North America (e.g., caravel ships, improved navigational instruments, the quest for new lands);

– describe the expansion of European influence through the founding of the first trading posts (e.g., Île Ste Croix, Port Royal, Québec, Mont Royal, Fort William) and explain how the fur trade served the interests of both the Europeans and the First Nation peoples;

– identify the results of contact for both the Europeans and the First Nation peoples (e.g., sharing of beliefs, knowledge, and skills; intermarriage; trading alliances and conflicts; impact of European diseases on First Nation peoples; impact of fur trade on natural resources such as beaver populations).

Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills
By the end of Grade 6, students will:

– formulate questions with a statement of purpose to develop research plans (e.g., Why did Cartier kidnap Donnacona and his sons? What was the role of First Nation women in the fur trade?);

– select relevant resources and identify their point of view (e.g., recognize the historical context of Cartier’s logbook; recognize bias in Champlain’s drawing and descriptions of Mohawk villages);

– identify and explain differing opinions about the positive and negative effects of early contact between European and First Nation peoples (e.g., growth of First Nation peoples’ dependency on trade goods; impact of the fur trade on the economy and environment; effect of attempts to convert the Huron Nation to Christianity);

– use and construct a variety of graphic organizers to clarify and interpret information (e.g., cause-and-effect diagrams linking the environment and First Nation cultures, mind maps to connect the results of early contact, diagrams and captions to illustrate technological advances that allowed exploration);

– read, interpret, and compare historical and modern maps of an area to determine accuracy (e.g., Champlain’s maps versus present-day maps of North America; a map based on Magellan’s journey versus modern projections of the world);

– build models or draw and label various forms of maps, using cartographic symbols and a legend (e.g., model of a Mohawk village,maps of explorers’ routes, maps of waterways used for the fur trade);

– observing bibliographic conventions, use media works, oral presentations, written notes and reports, drawings, tables, charts, and graphs to communicate the results of inquiries about the effects of early contact between First Nation peoples and early European explorers (e.g., the causes of the disappearance of the Neutral Nation, the influence of French fashion on the expansion of the fur trade);

– use appropriate vocabulary (e.g., Métis, clan, council, Anishinabek, consensus, social, Haudenosaunee, political, archaeological, caravel, astrolabe, bias, epidemic, alliance, monopoly) to describe their inquiries and observations.

Application
By the end of Grade 6, students will:

– explain how cooperation between First Nation groups and early European explorers benefited both groups (e.g., Europeans gained medical knowledge, survival skills, and geographic knowledge from First Nation peoples; First Nation peoples acquired products of European technology such as cooking pots, metal tools, blankets, and clothing; military alliances helped both groups against a common enemy);

– explain how differences between First Nation peoples and early European explorers led to conflicts between the two groups (e.g., lack of common language, differing world views and spiritual beliefs, introduction of European diseases, differing views about property ownership);

– express their personal viewpoints, based on historical evidence, about the outcomes of early contact between First Nation peoples and early European explorers (e.g., report on the origins and challenges of the Métis Nation; use a storyboard to show the events leading to the establishment and destruction of Ste-Marie-Among-the-Hurons; present the results of an Internet search on a specific Hudson’s Bay Company or North West Company trading post);

– identify some present-day issues concerning First Nation peoples that relate to results of early contact (e.g., the effect of new technologies on First Nation cultures; land claims);

– identify achievements and contributions of Aboriginal people in present-day Canada (e.g., James Bartleman, Jordin Tootoo, Douglas Cardinal, Susan Aglukark).

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Canada and World Connections: Grade 6 – Canada’s Links to the World

Overview
Students identify and describe Canada’s economic, political, social, and physical links with the United States and other regions of the world. They use a variety of inquiry methods and research tools to investigate the importance of international connections for Canada’s well-being and influence in the world. Students identify current international issues that concern Canada, and describe Canada’s response to them.

Overall Expectations

By the end of Grade 6, students will:

• identify and describe Canada’s economic, political, social, and physical links with the United States and other regions of the world;

• use a variety of resources and tools to gather, process, and communicate information about the domestic and international effects of Canada’s links with the United States and other areas of the world;

• explain the relevance to Canada of current global issues and influences.

Specific Expectations

Knowledge and Understanding
By the end of Grade 6, students will:

– identify some countries with which Canada has links (e.g., in Europe, the Pacific Rim, the Americas, Asia, the Middle East,Africa);

– describe some of the connections Canada shares with the rest of the world (e.g., trade, history, geography, tourism, economic assistance, immigration, indigenous peoples, peacekeeping, media, and culture);

– identify products that Canada imports and exports (e.g., imports: fruit, vegetables, chemicals, motor vehicles; exports: newsprint, grain, machinery, timber, telecommunications, natural gas);

– identify the countries to which Canada exports goods (e.g., the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, China, Germany);

– identify the countries from which Canada imports goods (e.g., the United States, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany, other European countries, Taiwan, South Korea, Mexico);

– identify some important international organizations/agreements in which Canada participates and describe their purpose (e.g., the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the North American Free Trade Agreement, the World Health Organization, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Commonwealth of Nations, la Francophonie, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation [APEC] association);

– identify Canada’s connections with the United States through the media, trade, immigration, culture, technology, tourism, history, and geography (e.g., television programs, trade in vehicles, historical roots, common geographic features, shared waterways, common environmental initiatives);

– describe distinguishing characteristics of the United States (e.g., climate, physical features, political system, economic activities, international influence, celebrations);

– describe distinguishing characteristics of a country in another region with which Canada has links (e.g., climate, physical features, political system, economic activities, international influence, celebrations).

Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills
By the end of Grade 6, students will:

– formulate questions to develop research plans with a statement of purpose (e.g., How has Canada achieved its reputation as a leading peacekeeping country? How does tourism benefit Canadians? What are some current issues arising from Canadian/ U.S. trade relations? Why does the U.S. government recognize Jay’s Treaty but the Canadian government does not? Why do some Canadian companies choose to manufacture goods outside of North America?);

– use a variety of primary and secondary sources to locate and process relevant information about Canada’s links with the world (e.g., primary sources: statistics, field trips, interviews, original documents; secondary sources: maps, illustrations, print materials, videos, CD-ROMs, Internet sites);

– analyse, classify, and interpret information about the United States and at least one other country from another region of the world;

– use and construct a variety of graphic organizers and graphs to sort, classify, connect, and interpret information (e.g., tables to show countries and total trade; double bar graphs to compare imports to exports; circle graphs to show how tourist dollars are spent);

– observing bibliographic conventions, use media works, oral presentations, written descriptions, illustrations, tables, charts, maps, and graphs to communicate main ideas, with supporting evidence, about the various regions of the United States and about one other country from another region of the world;

– use appropriate vocabulary (e.g., technology, culture, immigration, tourism, physical features, indigenous peoples, export, import, parallels, meridians, Pacific Rim, economics, media) to describe their inquiries and observations.

Map, Globe, and Graphic Skills*
By the end of Grade 6, students will:

– use base maps and a variety of information sources to sketch the relative position of places (e.g., location of trading partners, popular tourist areas of the United States and Canada);

– create maps using shading/colour to show details of the physical characteristics of regions (e.g., resources, agriculture, climate, elevation);

– use information about time zones to identify time differences among regions of the world;

– use special-purpose maps (e.g., contour maps, climatic maps, physical-features maps) to find specific geographic information;

– use latitude and longitude coordinates to locate some major cities and countries of the world;

– compare various map projections of the world (e.g., Mercator, Peters, Mollweide, Atlantic-centred and Pacific-centred), and analyse their differences to determine the particular bias of each.

* The knowledge and skills described under this subheading are essential to students’ achievement of expectations listed under the other three subheadings.

Application
By the end of Grade 6, students will:

– use an appropriate presentation format to show how the contributions of an outstanding Canadian are recognized in the global community as well as in Canada (e.g., in dance, sports, music, literature, art, science, technology);

– describe some ways in which Canada has influenced other countries (e.g., through the arts, technology, sports, literature, media, telecommunications, satellites);

– describe some influences of other countries on contemporary Canadian society and the lifestyles of Canadians (e.g., technologies, diseases, heritage celebrations, foods, sports, entertainment);

– describe Canada’s participation in international efforts to address current global issues (e.g., peacekeeping, environmental initiatives, world health initiatives, disaster relief, regulation of child labour, human rights violations, acceptance of refugees).
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Ontarion Curriculum for Social Studies - Grade 6
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